Asparagus is a cool season vegetable that does best in climates with cool nights and warm days. It grows wild in North America, especially in the north east and north central regions.

Cool weather allows asparagus to grow without having to go through the peak growing months of spring.

The soil needs to be well-drained, high in organic matter, loose, and not have wet spots or standing water. You can also add compost or aged manure if you have it on hand. The bed needs to be prepared well as well.

A raised bed is one of the best ways to get your asparagus garden started quickly and easily! Raised beds are perfect for small spaces, growing vegetables vertically instead of horizontally, and for keeping plants contained so pests don’t make easy targets of your precious vegies.

With just a few plastic lumber stakes and some soil, you can create a simple but effective design that’s great for planting vegetable gardens like an expert

In this guide we’ll show you everything you need to know about starting an asparagus garden from seedling through harvest.

How to grow asparagus the easy way | Tom’s Guide

Why grow asparagus in a raised bed?

Raised beds are perfect for small spaces, growing vegetables vertically instead of horizontally, and for keeping plants contained so pests don’t make easy targets of your precious vegies.

With just a few plastic lumber stakes and some soil, you can create a simple but effective design that’s great for planting vegetable gardens like an expert.

Raised beds give plants the best chance at survival; this means you can save seeds for next year to harvest fresh asparagus all season long.

Growing asparagus in raised beds is also a fun way to get your children involved in the garden!

Which type of bed to use?

There are many different types of raised beds, but a traditional wooden or metal bed is ideal.

While you can use any type of wood, it’s best to use pressure-treated wood that has been treated with the chemical copper azole.

Make sure to place your raised bed in an area that doesn’t get too much sunlight and where it won’t be disturbed by pets or children.

Herbs in yard. Raised-bed gardening

Preparing your bed for asparagus growing

First, make sure your raised bed is in an area that gets lots of sun. Asparagus loves a lot of light and will yield more if you place it in a spot where it gets good sun exposure.

If you have access to plenty of hardwood trees, you can place the bed under the canopy for extra protection from cold weather.

If you have room, try constructing your raised bed around a tree or shrub for extra shade. Second, prepare your soil well before planting.

The soil needs to be well-drained and high in organic matter such as compost or aged manure. The soil should also not be wet or standing water so keep this in mind when choosing your site. Third, add some compost or fresh manure to the topsoil before planting.

You can also buy organic fertilizer at a garden center to help give your plants a jumpstart on growth!

Finally, choose which type of seedling you want to plant — either start with transplants or direct sow them into the ground from seeds.

How much does an asparagus bed require?

An asparagus bed needs to be about six feet wide and four feet deep for two plants. As for the height, it varies depending on what you want to plant in your garden.

The taller vegetables like tomatoes and beans need more vertical space, but shorter plants like herbs or flowers can be planted closer together.

School garden with row of raised bed and PVC pipe for cold frame support at elementary school near Dallas, Texas, America. Running tracks and residential houses are in background

Planting asparagus seedlings

The best time to plant an asparagus seedling is in the late fall when the soil is cool and moist. As soon as possible, follow these steps:

1. Dig a hole that’s twice as deep as the size of the pot you’re transplanting your asparagus seedlings into.

2. Plant your seedling at least 2 inches deep into loose soil with the crown of the plant above ground level, or around one inch below ground level.

3. Fill in around your young plants with more soil, tamping it down firmly so that it doesn’t come up above ground level.

4. Water well so that water reaches right up to the crowns of your young plants and then wait to see if they sprout roots

5. If you want, you can add a layer of rock wool or other small pieces of gravel on top of your planting bed to help retain moisture and keep any weed seeds from growing through the soil 6. If you have a black plastic mulch cover, cover it with about 6 inches of mulch so that weeds don’t grow under it

7. Make sure there’s plenty of sunshine for your plants for at least 4 hours per day

8. Check carefully once every few weeks for signs of insects like aphids or whitefly

9. Once they are strong enough to survive on their own, start thinning out heavy-feeding shoots by cutting them off at around 12″

Care & feeding your asparagus plants

Asparagus plants need a lot of water to grow. They are grown from seeds or small transplants, so be sure your plant gets plenty of nutrients and water throughout the growing season.

When it’s time to harvest, make sure you don’t over-water your asparagus plants. As the leaves get bigger, they’ll need more water for their growth.

In fact, you should probably stop watering at least five days before harvesting so that the spears have time to dry out. Like most crops, asparagus needs lots of light exposure to grow well.

This means that in your growing bed, you’ll want to leave at least 6 inches between any other plants and your asparagus plant so that its roots can receive all the needed sunlight exposure.

Keep them well-watered while they’re growing and be careful not to let their roots dry out in their newly established bed.

To avoid damage caused by pests like slugs, use copper wire to create a barrier around the perimeter of the bed.

Wrapping up

Raised beds are a great way to start an asparagus garden in a smaller space. They keep the plants contained and away from pests that might otherwise eat your crops.

Raised Bed Asparagus is a cool season vegetable that does best in climates with cool nights and warm days. Cool weather allows asparagus to grow without having to go through the peak growing months of spring.

The soil needs to be well-drained, high in organic matter, loose, and not have wet spots or standing water. You can also add compost or aged manure if you have it on hand. The bed needs to be prepared well as well.

A raised bed is one of the best ways to get your asparagus garden started quickly and easily! Raised beds are perfect for small spaces, growing vegetables vertically instead of horizontally, and for keeping plants contained so pests don’t make easy targets of your precious vegies.

With just a few plastic lumber stakes and some soil, you can create a simple but effective design that’s great for planting vegetable gardens like an expert In this guide we’ll show you everything you need to know about starting an asparagus garden from seedling through harvest.

FAQs

What are the benefits of raised beds?

Raised beds are great for your asparagus garden because they provide a space that’s not only aerated but also well-drained.

The extra space allows you to grow more of the asparagus crop, which is great for yield and profit. Asparagus is a tall growing vegetable that needs plenty of growing room.

The bed also has room underneath for planting the roots without them touching the ground. The bed can be filled with a soil-less mix or diggers can be used to plant directly into the ready-made raised beds.

Rows of asparagus plants can also be spaced in a trench that’s dug along the side of the bed, then stepped along to fill in the trench with soil. This is great for keeping weeds under control. Essentially, you’re creating a tunnel that links two beds together!

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